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Eight to Twelve Weeks Pregnant

 

Eight to Twelve Weeks Pregnant

This business of explaining to people how far along you are in your pregnancy! When you have COMPLETED Eight weeks of pregnancy, you are in your NINTH week, but you are not nine weeks pregnant – yet

How you might feel between eight and twelve weeks of pregnancy:

  • Bloating
  • Nausea, vomiting, food aversions or food cravings
  • Intense fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Mood swings
  • Increased urination
  • Sensitive breasts and nipples
  • Breasts may grow and nipples and areola and sebaceous glands of the areola (little brown or pink bumps)get darker

Things you may do between eight and twelve weeks of pregnancy:

  • If nausea and vomiting are a problem, you may want to read up on remedies. Motherisk is a great resource and even has a forum where you can talk to other moms having trouble with this.
  • Your bra may start to feel tight. It may be time to get bras in a larger cup size. You don’t need a maternity bra – a well-fitted bra of any sort will do. If your bra’s cups still fit but the band it too tight around your ribs, ask for a bra extender.
  • You may feel that your pants are too tight, or that you don’t like anything tight around your middle – even though you are not “showing” a pregnancy bump yet. Bella Bands or other waist band extenders are available for that time before you actually need to buy new, maternity pants.
  • Some women have very few symptoms of pregnancy at this stage. They don’t have nausea, they aren’t showing yet and they sometimes worry: “Am I really pregnant?” This feeling will pass, with time, as your body start to grow to accommodate the baby.
  • Buy a pregnancy book or two. Our favourites include:
    • Pregnancy Childbirth and the Newborn by Penny Simkin
    • The New Pregnancy & Childbirth: Choices & Challenges by Sheila Kitzinger
    • Ina May’s Guide to Childbirth by Ina May Gaskin

 Between eight and twelve weeks of pregnancy, your care-provider will probably:

  • be seeing you every four weeks at this stage
  • weigh you at each visit and discuss healthy weight gain
  • check your blood pressure
  • check your urine for protein and infection
  • discuss nutrition and food safety
  • palpate and measure your abdomen
  • after 10 or 12 weeks of pregnancy, you and your care provider will be able to hear the baby’s heart beat using a hand held Doppler ultrasound device.
  • discuss work place safety with you
  • discuss genetic screening tests

Things you can do for your health and your baby’s health: (Note that all the tasks below are just as important for the non-childbearing parent (the father or other parent) to undertake. The health of a child is affected by the health of the whole family, not just the mother’s.)

  • Talk, talk, talk with your partner about your plans as co-parents. This is a good time to work on your relationship and make it as strong and harmonious as possible.
  • Continue your normal physical activity routine. Unless you have some special risk, there is no need to reduce your activity.
  • Try a prenatal yoga or fitness class – a good place to meet other pregnant women
  • Avoid hot-tubs, steam rooms, saunas and hot yoga. Anything that raises your body temperature above 102°F or 38.9°C may put your baby at risk.
  • If you find yourself worrying about whether the risks of taking medication, or herbs, or  environmental toxins, you should of course, consult your doctor or midwife. But if you need the answer right now, try Motherisk.
  • Join the Pregnancy Happy Hour on Fridays evenings at the Mothering Touch Centre – “You don’t have to be showing to show up!”

Resources: